Sorry, Shakespeare!

There was an odd issue which had been troubling me for days. I brought it up during my causal discussion with people who were aware of Shakespearean literature, though not in depth. Today, strangely, Debora, a Grade IX student brought it up. I instantly gave her my best compliments. What she asked me was why … Continue reading Sorry, Shakespeare!

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The Fall of the House of Usher

A good work of art will go on intriguing us and will grow as we grow. In fact, a final decyphering of a work of art is impossible both individually and generally. If a work of art is understood forever, then it does not exist as a work of art any more for a particular … Continue reading The Fall of the House of Usher

To Build a Fire (1908 version) by Jack London

Written at a time when modernism was in its cradle, To Build a Fire by Jack London was a forerunner of modern fiction. Modern Literature does not treat a work as a finished product. It is only a conduit through which the reader and the writer interact to create art as a befitting product of … Continue reading To Build a Fire (1908 version) by Jack London

Afternoon with Irish Cows

Scientists mostly ask questions about the world outside themselves. It is very rare that they question themselves or try to learn about themselves. There is no subjectivity here. But artists, on the other hand, keep questioning themselves and ask questions to themselves. They are introspective and want to know more about themselves. Poetry, for example, … Continue reading Afternoon with Irish Cows

The Rattrap

The Rattrap by Selma Lagerlof, the Swedish Nobel laureate, reads like a folk tale but holds a very meaningful message for us. In the context of a man’s experience around Christmas time, the story explores the edge experience has over intelligence, knowledge and wisdom. It also highlights the importance compassion has in transforming a person. The story features a vagabond who earned his … Continue reading The Rattrap

The Sea Eats the Land at Home

Notes by Sreekumar K Kofi Awoonor’s poem The Sea Eats the Land at Home, using a string of concrete visual images,  depicts the tragic picture of a people losing themselves and their belongings. It is possible that the poem has an allegorical slant too, since the poet does not say home on land but land … Continue reading The Sea Eats the Land at Home